Thursday, December 30, 2010

New Year's Eve Speculations

Filling in with some background information during a letter-writing hiatus from December 20, 1949 to January 5, 1950, as June enjoys Christmas break at home (with frequent dates with Art)…

When Art was young, the Price family would celebrate New Year’s Eve by staying up until midnight, listening to Guy Lombardo on the radio and waiting for the countdown to the ball dropping in Times Square.  At the stroke of midnight, Art, his sister Dorothy, his father, and his mother would cry out, "Happy New Year!" and bang on whatever was handy, making noisemakers out of anything available.  Art’s mother would sometimes open the front door and clash the metal lids of her pans together like cymbals.  Then, from the radio, Guy Lombardo and the Royal Canadians would play Auld Lang Syne, the traditional first song of the new year.

One of Art's photos, circa 1949, unknown location
and people at a party.
That was back in the old days.  Art was older now and would take June out to celebrate New Year’s Eve.  His first plan of spending the evening at Smitty’s fell through when Smitty booked a private party at his restaurant.  We don’t know if the fall-back plan was another restaurant or a private party.
Drawing by Art Price.
Chances are that Art and June spent the evening somewhere with “the boys,” the now familiar group of Joe Cerullo, Bruno Marcincuk, Jack Raynor, Walter “Singer” Hoinski, Frank “Farmer” Stachecki, and Frank "Footles" Hoffman.

Did June and Art see each other just on weekends and holidays over this two-week break or was it more often than that?  Well, at the end of this time, Art will look back and write:

“This is the first evening I’ve been home in two weeks.  There were some awfully nice evenings in between there.”

It sounds like they saw a lot of each other.

© 2010 Lee Price

Wednesday, December 29, 2010

Two Portraits of Great Grandfather

Filling in with some background information during a letter-writing hiatus from December 20, 1949 to January 5, 1950, as June enjoys Christmas break at home (with frequent dates with Art)…

My next free night I really have to do some work on my great grandfather.  I wonder if that last sentence sounded strange to you?  I mean work on his portrait.
                                                                  Art Price
                                                                  Letter to June Anderson, Dec. 15, 1949

There are two versions of this painting.

Art was unsatisfied with his first attempt at a portrait of his great grandfather George J. Werner.  He was working from a photograph of his ancestor in his Civil War uniform, posed after the war as is indicated by the Grand Army of the Republic insignia on his cap.  This is the first version of Art’s painting.

Portrait of George J. Werner, oil painting by Art Price.

Then Art tried again.  This time he painted his great grandfather against a landscape typical of the backgrounds found in some of his other paintings.

Portrait of George J. Werner, oil painting by Art Price.

Art’s great grandfather George J. Werner was born in Baden, Germany in the early to mid-1840s.  While still a boy, he and his family immigrated to the United States.  He would have been in his late teens or early twenties and probably living in New York City when the Civil War broke out.

George Werner entered the army in a brigade composed entirely of German immigrants living in New York.  He started in Company E, 20th New York Volunteer Infantry, in September 1862.  His service in the Army of the Potomac placed him at important battles in Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia.  He was slightly wounded by gunshot on his right side near Cold Harbor, Virginia in July 1864.  Promoted to the rank of Sergeant, he continued his service and was present at Appomattox Courthouse at the conclusion of the war on April 9, 1865.  His service continued a few months longer, and he was honorably discharged on June 24, 1865.

After the war, records indicate that George Werner married Emma Baldwin, and he worked as a hatter in a felt hat factory and later as a letter carrier in Orange, New Jersey.  George and Emma had two sons, Herbert and Edwin.  Herbert was Art’s grandfather;  Ada Belle (Art’s mother) was his daughter.

© 2010 Lee Price

Monday, December 27, 2010

Nice Weather for Dating


Draft newsletter cover for the
Southampton V.F.W. by Art Price.
There was no white Christmas for Southampton and Riverhead in 1949 and, in fact, there hadn’t been any significant snow accumulations yet that year.  It was probably cold enough to snow, with the temperature in the low 30s for Christmas morning, but there was no snow reported.

The day after Christmas was one of the warmest on record.  The temperature reached 54 degrees that afternoon.  The nighttime temperature only dropped to the low 40s.

The weather remained warm but clouds moved in on Tuesday (December 27, 1949) and it rained
                                                                                     most of the day.

And that was as bad as the weather got over Christmas break in 1949.  The rain passed by the next day, the sun came back out, and the pleasant, unseasonably mild, weather returned.  It was nice weather for dating and frequent trips back and forth between Southampton and Riverhead.

The snow shovels remained untouched in the Price's garage on Cooper Street.  Some years you get lucky.

Thanks to Weather Underground for their excellent historic weather data!

© 2010 Lee Price

Saturday, December 25, 2010

Christmas Art

When this entry was first posted, we were uncertain
who painted this.  Since then, Diane M. Martin Anderson
has shared that she remembers this as a paint-by-numbers
painting done by June's mother, Maud Anderson.
This sounds right to me.


Draft newsletter for Southampton United
Methodist Church by Art Price.


Christmas cartoon by Art Price.

© 2010 Lee Price

Friday, December 24, 2010

Christmas Candlelight Service, 1949

I was very surprised when you invited me to the Candlelight Service on Christmas Eve.  I thought you would be ushering in Southampton and I wouldn’t see you that night.”
                                                               June Anderson
                                                               Letter to Art Price, Dec. 19, 1949

Draft of newsletter design for the
Southampton United Methodist Church
by Art Price.
Art and his parents were very busy with activities at the church throughout the year but especially at Christmas.  One of the letters refers to how Art helped his father put up the two huge Christmas trees that dominated the front of the sanctuary during the Advent season.

The Southampton United Methodist Church had one Christmas Eve service, beginning at 11 p.m. and ending at midnight.  In the 1940s, you’d dress up for the service.  Men would be in suits and women in dresses.  Art would have picked June up at her house in Riverhead that evening and brought her to Southampton.  They would have sat with his parents in the pews on the left side, near the front.

Candles were handed out at the beginning of the service.  At the Christmas Eve service, there was more singing than usual – nearly all of the traditional Christmas carols.  The Christmas story was read from the Gospel of Luke.  The minister’s sermon was kept blessedly short.

Near the end of the service, the ushers came forward to light their candles from the Christ candle at the altar.  Then they proceeded back through the church, pew by pew, lighting the first candle in each row.  Down the pew, each candle would light the next until the church was filled with shimmering candles.  The main lights were turned off and the congregation sang “Silent Night” in a church glittering with candlelight.  Then, still in candlelit darkness, the organist tolled twelve notes signifying midnight.  There was a moment of silence and then the service ended with a rousing “Joy to the World.”

June and Art would have blown out their candles before venturing out into the cold December night.  He still had to return June to Riverhead for Christmas at home with the family, probably not getting home himself until well after 1 a.m.

(Tomorrow – Christmas art.)

© 2010 Lee Price

Thursday, December 23, 2010

The Most Romantic Blog on the Internet

Filling in with some background information during a letter-writing hiatus from December 20, 1949 to January 5, 1950, as June enjoys Christmas break at home (with frequent dates with Art)…

June and Art.
While there is a break in the love letters from December 20, 1949 to January 5, 1950, there’s no break in the romance.  June and Art spent Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve together, probably visited together on Christmas and New Year’s Day, and doubtless went on dates whenever possible.

To recap:  June and Art’s romance began in May 1949, ripened that summer, and the love letters started when June left for school in New York City in late September.  June temporarily withdrew from school in October when her appendix burst.  She returned to school and the correspondence resumed in early November.  Within the past month, their love has been noticeably deepening as evidenced by exchanges such as these:

“Tomorrow I am going to walk into this room and there – lo and behold!  A great big fat letter from a real nice guy named Art.  And you know what?  It’s so anxious to be read it just jumps right in my arms.  I can daydream, can’t I?  Only tomorrow I hope it will be fact instead of fiction.  Remember, I miss you.  Please make my dream come true.”

“How I enjoyed yesterday!  Walking through Central Park, down Fifth Avenue, the ice show, Times Square – even walking in the rain.  I only hope you had half as good a time.”

“Keep in out of this cold weather and don’t walk in the rain without me.”

“I’m going to miss you tomorrow.  Even the Museum of Natural History isn’t as nice as you.”

“Six long days and five even longer evenings till you’re in my arms again.  I didn’t know I could miss anyone this much.  I’m almost glad I hadn’t met you while I was in the Navy.  I probably would have gone over the hill.”

“Only seven days left.  I miss you.  I don’t think I’ll send kisses.  I’m saving them for delivery in person.”

“I’m very eager to receive that special delivery in person.  Missing you.”

(Tomorrow – the candlelight Christmas Eve service.)

© 2010 Lee Price

Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Christmas Songs on the Radio, 1949

Filling in with some background information during a letter-writing hiatus from December 20, 1949 to January 5, 1950, as June enjoys Christmas break at home (with frequent dates with Art)…

Cartoon drawing by Art Price.
In their letters, June and Art frequently refer to the radio playing in the background, sometimes with old-time radio shows and often with music.  As Christmas neared, there would have been plenty of Christmas songs on the radio.

The huge Christmas hit of 1949 was “Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer” by Gene Autry, the famous singing cowboy.  This was something of a follow-up to Autry’s first major Christmas song, “Here Comes Santa Claus (Right Down Santa Claus Lane),” which was a top 10 hit of the 1947 Christmas season.  “Rudolph” was even bigger, a number one smash hit that sold over 2.5 million copies.  It would have dominated radio airplay during the week before Christmas 1949, 61 years ago.

These are some of the other popular Christmas songs that would have been in the air at the time:  “White Christmas,” “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” “Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!” “The Christmas Song,” “Blue Christmas” (Ernest Tubb version, not Elvis yet), “Sleigh Ride,” “Santa Claus Is Coming To Town,” “Winter Wonderland,” and “I’ll Be Home For Christmas,” along with traditional songs like “Jingle Bells” and, of course, all the Christmas carols.

They would not have heard the following (all written and performed after 1949):  “Frosty the Snowman,” “It’s Beginning to Look A Lot Like Christmas,” “Silver Bells,” “We Need a Little Christmas,” “Jingle Bell Rock,” “It’s the Most Wonderful Time of the Year,” “Feliz Navidad,” “The Little Drummer Boy,” “Grandma Got Run Over By a Reindeer,” “All I Want for Christmas Is You,” and that one where the dogs bark “Jingle Bells.”

(Tomorrow – a romantic recap.)

© 2010 Lee Price

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

A Visit to the Frick

Filling in with some background information during a letter-writing hiatus from December 20, 1949 to January 5, 1950, as June enjoys Christmas break at home (and frequent dates with Art)…

As planned, June’s mother arrived in the city on Tuesday, December 20.  She traveled on the Long Island Rail Road to Penn Station in New York City, where June would have met her at a station packed with Christmas travelers.

Maud (June’s mother) was a small-town Southern girl from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia.  After her marriage to Theodore Anderson, the young couple briefly lived in New York City.  Maud retained very fond memories of her young married life in the city.  After forgetting her mother’s birthday (!), June felt she owed her mother a good time in the city and she hoped to make the visit as special as possible.

June planned to take her mother out for some last minute Christmas shopping and also a visit to June’s favorite museum, The Frick Collection at Fifth Avenue and 70th Street.  A private mansion converted into an Old Masters art museum, The Frick Collection is an elegant, tranquil oasis in the heart of the city.  Escaping from the bustle of the Christmas crowds, June and her mother would have enjoyed time with masterpieces by Vermeer, Rembrandt, Velázquez, Holbein, Titian, El Greco, and many other legendary European masters.
 
The Boucher Room, decorated with large oil panels by François Boucher,
at The Frick Collection in New York City (early 1950s).
Image courtesy of The Frick Collection/
Frick Art Reference Library Archives.

(Tomorrow – Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer.)

© 2010 Lee Price

Monday, December 20, 2010

I Could Dance All Night Long

Monday, December 19, 1949

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City

Dear Art,

Two letters from you today!  I think Shirl likes it when I hear from you – I’m always so happy afterwards.  She’s lucky I didn’t stand on my head.

The day after tomorrow I’ll meet Mother at the Long Island Station about 11 in the morning, then off for shopping and museums.  Don’t worry, I’ll be home Thursday night.

This is going to be a very short letter.  I’ve decided to do my Historic Research before going home so I won’t have to drag it along with me.  I’d like to finish most of it tonight and hear I am already tired.  I have a lot of work to do on it so I’ll probably be up till what do they say?  The wee hours of the morning?  This is the 1st night I feel sleep, too.

All my Love,

June

P.S.  Art, I just – wait I’m so happy I’ll start different, like – Art, love, I’m bubbling over!  If you were here I’d give you one great big kiss.  You’d better watch out – I’m so happy I might kiss anybody.  Guess what?  It’s a little after midnight and I have just finished – finished, you hear – Historic Research!  No taking it home, no worry about it.  No nothing.  I’m tickled pink!

I could dance all night long, or turn somersaults or backbends – I hate to go to bed, I feel like celebrating.  It’s so seldom I get any homework done.  I’m even ahead of Shirl!  She’s going to finish tomorrow night.

I loved your letters today.  I’m glad I didn’t know you when you were in the Navy, too.  I would have worried.

I’m too pleased to think.  Maybe I can get Shirl to have a pillow fight with me or something.

All my Love,

June





























 (Tomorrow – a visit to the Frick.)

© 2010 Lee Price

Sunday, December 19, 2010

A Surprise Invitation

Sunday, December 18, 1949

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City

Dear Art,

June's father Theodore Anderson
working at the phone company.
How nice it was to hear you today.  I always said the telephone was a marvelous invention – and not just because Daddy works for the phone company!  You called a little earlier than I expected – but that was nice too – a very convenient time.

I was very surprised when you invited me to the Candlelight Service on Christmas Eve.  I thought you would be ushering in Southampton and I wouldn’t see you that night.

Heaven knows what we’ll do in school tomorrow.  Just say goodbye to the rest of the kids, I guess.  Two more days of school, a merry whirl with Mother in the city, then home!

Today Shirl and I went to the American Museum of Natural History to see that “From the Neck Up” exhibition.  It turns out that a lot that was donated by Traphagen.  That Ethel Traphagen has more stuff there than the Metropolitan and private collectors put together!

I’m very anxious to receive that special delivery in person.  Missing you.

All my love,

June

(Tomorrow – the last letter before the break.)

© 2010 Lee Price

The Gin Mills of Southampton

Sunday, December 18, 1949

20 Cooper Street
Southampton, NY

Dear June: 

Wonderful to talk to you today but as usual I couldn’t think of all the things I wanted to say.

Last night, I went to the movies with Frank Hoffman.  Then he and I and Joe Cerullo watched wrestling at the Anchorage for awhile then went to the Polish Hall and saw the rest of the boys there.  Then to Peter’s, took Frank home, and out to Julie’s with Joe.  We stopped at Pete’s again on the way back and met Bruno, Farmer, and Singer there.  Then back to the Windmill to eat, and finished the night at the Hampton Bays Diner.  Finally got home at 4 in the morning.  I stuck to beer all night.  Today I discovered a small dent in my rear fender opposite the driver side.  That’s what I get for parking outside of gin mills!  It can be fixed easily but I hate to see it.

I thought of you all evening.  If just one other guy had decided to go to the city, I would have been with him.

I went to church twice today, regular service in the morning and Christmas music at 4:30 in the afternoon.  Otherwise I’ve done nothing all day.  Only four days and three nights till I see you.  Tomorrow will be my last letter before Christmas, as you know.

Remember me to everybody.  I hope you and your mother have a good time.  I’ll be over Thursday night as early as I can, probably around 7:30.  I hope you’ll be there by then.  If not, I’ll wait.  I miss you, but I’ll be seeing you soon.  I’m a lucky guy.

Lots of love,

Art

(Tonight – a surprise invitation to the candlelight service.)

© 2010 Lee Price

Saturday, December 18, 2010

The Worst Day Not To Get Mail


Still life with glasses, pencil drawing by Art Price.

Saturday, December 17, 1949

20 Cooper St.
Southampton, NY

Dear June: 

Saturday is the worst day not to get mail.  There was no mail when I came home today for lunch but while I was eating the mailman came and there your letter was, written Thursday.  It was a nice letter but you certainly haven’t been behaving yourself:  Missing another day after all you’ve missed already!  I’ll bet you didn’t tell your folks about it either.  Still I’m glad you enjoyed the Radio City
Music Hall show.  Maybe I’ll see it next year.

I went along to pick up my sister.  I don’t know why.  I slept all the way back.

I think I’ll go to the movies tonight even though I have seen it (She Wore a Yellow Ribbon).  I’ll try and get home early afterward.

I miss you more tonight than ever. 

Lots of love

Art

(Tomorrow – out with the boys in Southampton.)

© 2010 Lee Price

Friday, December 17, 2010

Still Life with Girdle

Friday, December 16, 1949

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City

Dear Art,

About half an hour ago I began to get bored.  I took a soft pencil, a kneaded rubber eraser, and a piece of paper about 5” x 7” in hand and proceeded to do my first still life.  I got in the dirty chair, the lamp that doesn’t work and the dying ivy in the corner.  The crooked furniture of my picture didn’t quite catch the impression of this room so I added Shirl’s girdle over the arm of the chair.  Made it much more homey.  I’m not sure if she appreciated it.

Fashion sketch by
June Anderson.
Shirl did homework tonight.  In lettering class, the assignment was to make an envelope for a store – you know, the little paper bags with flaps that they put stockings, ties, etc. in?  Well, we had to make up a store name and design for our envelope.  Shirl had done it twice before and wasn’t pleased with her results.  So she sat down tonight to do it for the third and last time.  At last she finished.  Picking it up to examine it, she announced that she was pleased with the results, then all at once let out a loud groan.  She had put everything on upside down!  The flap was on the bottom.  How we laughed!  Poor Shirl.

We had life class this morning, and I did my best drawing (charcoal) of this term.  At least in my opinion.  And I finally went to that draping class this afternoon!  What’s more, I finished draping and cutting a French lining on my cute little size 14 dummy, which is bigger by far than me.  Anyway, all I have to do is baste this creation together, and I’ll do that here before Christmas.  Everybody had better get busy before I catch up with them!

Evita, the little baby, came in to visit us tonight.  She had on clean clothes and shoes, and was very cute.  Her mother wasn’t around so she let me take her by the hand and lead her around.  For the first time I saw her walk!!  She kept toppling over with a smile on her face that would change to one of amazement.

Study of children's growth
by June Anderson.
Evita found our red rug, sat down on it and talked her head off.  She was fascinated by the rug.  Guess it takes a child to appreciate it!  For someone who doesn’t like children, I act pretty silly, don’t I?

We have classes Monday and Tuesday but the few kids who are planning to stay expect to do nothing.  Sit around, gossip, say goodbye as they leave, maybe have a party.

What do you think about Bruno?  Do you think he forgot where he parked the car?

Remember the story about the Chinese girl whose lover was sent away in the Army?  She missed him so she wrote him a letter so long it was a book?  He broke the engagement because she must talk too much.  Reminds me of me!  But I’m in the mood to write today.

The days are creeping by, but soon it will be Thursday night and I’ll be in your car or, even better, in your arms.

All my love,

June

(Tomorrow – the worst day not to get mail.)

© 2010 Lee Price

Off to Patchogue

Friday, December 16, 1949

20 Cooper St.
Southampton, NY

Dear June: 

Glad to hear you finally wrote your mother a letter!  I hope you both have a good time next week.  But don’t have such a good time that you decide to stay another day.  That I couldn’t stand.

Art's father Arthur N. Price
out by the car.
It was very busy at Roulston’s today – people buying for Christmas, I guess.  I’m home now but I think I’ll ride up to Patchogue when my parents leave to get my sister.  If I don’t go, I’ll probably take a spin downtown and you know what that means.  There’s a good fight on television tonight.

Six long days and five even longer evenings till you’re in my arms again.  I didn’t know I could miss anyone this much.  I’m almost glad I hadn’t met you while I was in the Navy.  I probably would have gone over the hill.

Well, I’ll say so long now and head for Patchogue to get Sis.  Be good and see you soon.

Lots of love,

Art

(Tonight – still life with girdle.)

© 2010 Lee Price

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Great Grandfather's Portrait

Thursday, December 15, 1949

20 Cooper St.
Southampton, NY

Dear June: 

Just think, a week from tonight at this time you’ll be in my arms.  I hope I can wait till then.  I guess I’ll just have to.

Art's portrait of his great grandfather
George Werner in his Civil War uniform.
I had a fairly busy day today.  I went out early this evening with my father and helped him set up the big tree at church.  Then I came home and got quite a bit accomplished on my course.  My next free night I really have to do some work on my great grandfather.  I wonder if that last sentence sounded strange to you?  I mean work on his portrait.

I’m going to take it easy this Saturday.  If I go out, I’ll stick to beer and get home early.  If anyone mentions New York, I know three guys that are going to start throwing things.  Only seven days left.  I miss you.  I don’t think I’ll send kisses.  I’m saving them for delivery in person.

Loads of love,

Art

Special thanks to Rick Scholl for sending me this image of Art's portrait of his  great grandfather!

(Tomorrow – off to Patchogue.)

© 2010 Lee Price

You Lazy Bum!

Unsent letter from the collection.


Thursday, December 15, 1949

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City

Dear Art,

You don’t know how lucky you are.  If I had started this letter earlier you would be in the middle of a scolding right now.  It would have started out – “You lazy bum!”  All because I came home to no letter.  It was very disappointing.  However, about 8 this evening Mr. Kanter wandered in with a letter.  What a late time to distribute mail!

I was a very naughty girl today.  You see, it’s this way.  Last week, Dot saw the Christmas show at Radio City Music Hall with the movie On the Town.  Well, ever since, she’s been telling Shirl and I how wonderful it was.  But Shirl and I have been strong willed.  We held out and concentrated on our work.  Then this morning, we wandered merrily into class about 9:10.  Then this morning, we had nothing to do at school so we wandered out for a smoke (I use the term loosely – I have never smoked in school).  Anyway, we saw Mel and Irv outside and they started telling us right away that they had seen the show and oh! how outstanding it was.  We couldn’t stand it any longer.  Two o’clock found us watching the Nativity scene.  And it was beautiful, and the picture was swell, too.

You mention artwork every once in awhile.  What are you working on?

Don’t worry about my work.  All my assignments have been checked and corrected and just need to be finished on good paper.  I can work nicely at home.  I’ll sleep till 10, do homework in the afternoon, and have my nights free?

I’m sitting here whiling time away.  Three schooldays, the weekend, and mother’s visit to go.

All my love,

June

(Tonight – great grandfather's portrait.)

© 2010 Lee Price

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Planning for Mother's Visit

Wednesday, December 14, 1949

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City

Dear Art,

I don’t see any reason why you shouldn’t pass on a little harmless gossip to me – especially when everyone else knows.  Poor Bruno but, as Shirl says, what else could he have expected if he knew Mary was dating?  Of course, it must have been very embarrassing to all – especially Mary.  Still it’s no wonder Bruno sounded odd, as you said Sunday.  How do you think he’s taking everything?


Just took a break and here I am again.  I had to put the letter up – couldn’t write and listen to the Lone Ranger at the same time.  Know what?  I like him.  He does good instead of going around shooting everybody like most of those programs.

I’ve been planning what I can do in the city with mother when she comes.  If we get a chance, I would like to take her to the Frick Museum.  That’s the one that was once a private house.  I know she would love it.

Sketches by
June Anderson.
Only four more schooldays!  It gives me a thrill counting the days as they grow less and less.  School gets nicer and nicer as we near vacation, with higher spirits, people leaving early, and work blissfully forgotten in the planning for Christmas.  I’ve accomplished everything I hoped to and still have four more days.  Of course, there’s still plenty of work – I just hadn’t planned on doing it yet.  Well, maybe I’ll get a spurt of energy.

I understand that you can’t come in this weekend.  You’ve come in more than I thought you would already.  I’ll be home in 7 days.  I hope they’ll be gone like a flash.

All my love,

June

(Tomorrow – the 1949 Christmas Show at Radio City Music Hall.)

© 2010 Lee Price

Never Mind that Debutante Slouch

Wednesday, December 14, 1949

20 Cooper Street
Southampton, NY

Dear June: 

Even though I know you are awfully busy on your Historic Research project, I hope you manage to write a couple of short letters anyway.  No day is complete without hearing from you.

I think I told you all about Bruno’s car.  Poor Bruno.  A lot of people seem to think he forgot where he parked it.

Art's nephew Peter Lawrence.

Today was my day off.  I slept late and did some Christmas shopping in the morning.  I visited across the street with my Aunt Nin and little Pete (the baby) and had lunch over there.  Saw Frank Hoffman in the afternoon.  He was in the city yesterday to see the Veterans Administration.  He goes back to watchmaking school after Christmas.  Tonight I saw Holiday Inn, quite old but very good – you’ve probably seen it before.  Here I just saw Bing in a picture that’s ten years old and now I’m sitting here listening to him on the radio.

I wish I was there when you wanted to wrestle.  We could go on television.  On second thought, maybe we’d better not (go on T.V., that is).  And never mind that debutante slouch, I like you sweet as you are.

I hope I didn’t tire you too much, but after all it’s not my fault that you didn’t get to sleep till 1:30 Sunday night.  That really was quite a weekend and worth every minute.  I miss you.  I’m counting the days – only eight more – that’s eight too many.

Lots of love

Art

(Tonight – planning for mother's visit to the city.)

© 2010 Lee Price