Thursday, April 28, 2011

Sleeping to Make the Time Pass

Detailed drawing of stitching by June Anderson.

Thursday, April 27, 1950

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City, NY

Dear Art,

Fashion illustration by
June Anderson.
Sweetheart, don’t worry about me.  I’m sorry I get moody and fuss about it to you.  Besides, if I can’t get along less than two weeks without you, it’s just too bad for me.  I know I have to get used to it.

The time is passing so slowly.  Ted and Shirl are out on a date tonight.  I think Shirl and I may have changed our minds and decided to move again.  But I can’t swear to it so I won’t say anymore about it.

This is my last letter before I leave, darling.  I love you and I’ll enlarge upon that statement this weekend.

Darling, it’s five minutes to one now and I’m ready to go to bed.  Shirl’s here.  I did some homework – quite a bit and that makes me feel pretty good.  I’m going to bed now.  The more I sleep, the quicker the time passes till I see you again.  I love you, darling.

All my love,

June

(For Monday – a rose-tinted world.)
 

© 2011 Lee Price

Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Let Me Call You Sweetheart

Tuesday, April 25, 1950

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City, NY

Dear Art,

Fashion illustration by
June Anderson.
I have so much homework (the old complaint).  I try to do some work in school but can’t seem to accomplish a thing.  Shirl’s making a plaid dress in school and she brought it home to do some work on it here tonight.  It’s all gored and pleated and she has to match all the plaids perfectly.  She worked so hard, finished, held it up to look at it (one seam) and you should have seen her face!  It was a glaring mistake.  We both got hysterical.  I’ve been teasing her ever since.  Poor kid.  I hope she’ll keep me for a roommate!

You couldn’t have answered that moody letter I sent you in any better way.  Not possibly.  I’m back normal enough, so I could even laugh at what you thought of it.  You were, of course, perfectly right.  The only thing is, will it be safe for me to come home Friday?

I hate to see the USA play sissy or anything, but they’d just better not have
a war with Russia until you’re 50 or so.  I just dare them.

Oh, darling!  They’re playing “Let Me Call You Sweetheart” on the radio.  May I?  But I seem to prefer darling anyway, so I guess I’ll just continue calling you that.  Darling and Art.  Both are nice.  Okay, darling?

All my love,

June

(For Thursday – more apologies for moodiness.)

© 2011 Lee Price

Monday, April 25, 2011

June, the Wonderful Housewife


Fashion illustration by June Anderson.

Monday, April 24, 1950

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City, NY

Dear Art,

I certainly hope you’re burning up my letters, or something similar.  They must sound awfully silly lately.

Shirl and I have cleaned up this place.  I vacuumed, dusted, and swept the chairs off.  I bet you didn’t know I would make such a wonderful housewife, did you?  Well, you’d probably be right!  I can’t cook either.  In fact, I’m practically helpless.  And I’m no raving beauty.  Oh, oh.  Why in the world DO you love me?  I’d better start acquiring some assets.

I loved talking to you today.  I felt much better afterward.  Shirl and I went to a movie – Key to the City with Clark Gable and Loretta Young.  We enjoyed it.  I hadn’t seen a movie with her in ages.

As you can tell, darling, I’m feeling quite good tonight.  It’s all because you were so understanding on the phone.  Hmmm!  If you were here I’d just wrap my arms around you and hug you so tight!  You’d have to struggle and fight to make me let go.  I love you so much.

I really can’t say much more.  All I can say is you are so sweet and wonderful you certainly deserve a nicer girl than a selfish creature like me.  But, darling, that doesn’t stop me from loving you one bit.

All my love,

June

(Tomorrow – Let me call you sweetheart.)

© 2011 Lee Price

Sunday, April 24, 2011

Three-Part Letter


Sunday, April 23, 1950

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City, NY

Dear Art,

Fashion illustration by June Anderson.
Well here’s another letter from your problem child again.  I’m here all alone on a Friday night, but I feel so much better than I did when I wrote that last letter.  I’ve read, eaten, and even done a little homework.

Darling, I’ve been listening to the radio all night.  Why must all the songs be love songs, or ones that we listen to together?  I’d love to have you here beside me tonight but you’re in my thoughts anyway.

Shirl’s out with Ted.  Heaven knows when she’ll get in.

I hope I can come home next weekend.  Complications seem to be arising.  Room hunting, you know.

Dear Art,

It’s now about 10:30 a.m. on Sunday morning.  You ought to be calling in about two hours, I suppose.

I had a lovely time over June’s and Betty’s apartment last night.  We played Canasta which I don’t like, and Bridge which I love.  They served some Southern fried
chicken which was delicious. 
June O’Neal’s from West Virginia, you know.  She cooked it.

Shirl and I room hunted yesterday and we didn’t see anything nice at all.  So we changed our minds again.  That means I’ll be home next weekend.  Will I be seeing you?

We’re going to the Bronx Zoo this afternoon which should be very nice.  Then Shirl’s going out this evening, which means another lonely night caged up in this room.

Well, that’s all for now.

- - - - -

Darling, this is after the telephone call from you.  I feel much better, sweetheart, I really do.  It’s just that sometimes I feel you don’t love me so much anymore and it frightens me.  I’m really sorry I’m so much worry to you.  But you fixed me up by talking to me.  We’re not going to the zoo.  It’s too bad out.  Maybe Shirl and I will go to the movies.  I love you, my darling – much too much.

Love,

June

(Tomorrow – June, the wonderful housewife.)

© 2011 Lee Price

Friday, April 22, 2011

June's Wild Mood Swings

Friday, April 21, 1950

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City, NY

Dear Art,

Pencil sketch by
June Anderson.
I think you had better tear this letter up without reading anymore of it.  I’m in a nasty mood tonight.  I don’t understand what’s the matter.  I’ve read your latest letter over and over again and even though it’s really a nice letter, I still feel miserable.  I think I’m homesick.

Before you go any further, I want to tell you right now that no matter what I say, I don’t want you to come in this weekend.  I realize that it’s too much of a trip to make just for a few hours for me.  And it wears you out.  Besides I don’t like you to travel by yourself.  So will you please ignore the rest now?  I just need to get something off my mind.

My friends are beginning to tease me.  “Loves light fading, etc.”  I know they’re just joking around and don’t mean it, but sometimes I begin to think – he used to come in to see me a lot, but now he hasn’t come in to see me since before Christmas.  It’s true – if I want to see you I have to come home.

Everybody I know here at school seems to be engaged or married.  I never saw anything like it.  And Shirl and Ted – well, I’ll tell you about her when I see you next week.  Shirl’s going out tomorrow night with Ted and will probably do the same all day Sunday.  I hope you will still want to see me next week after this awful letter because I do love you very much.  If I didn’t, I wouldn’t make myself such a pest to you.

Shirl and I don’t know if we’re going to move or not.  We keep changing our minds.  What an unstable life I lead.

Somehow writing you really has cheered me right up.  Maybe I’ll go out with Shirl.

- - - - -

I went out and had a sundae.  We talked.  Then I showered and washed my hair.  I can’t wait to see you again.  Mmmm.  I’m going to be a regular little wolfress the next time I see you.  Watch out!

There’s nothing like writing a little note to your boyfriend, is there?  I’ll try to behave myself, and be a good girl.  That is, as good as a bad girl can be.

All my love,

June

(For Sunday – a busy weekend.)
 

© 2011 Lee Price

Thursday, April 21, 2011

Trying Out a TV


Thursday, April 20, 1950

20 Cooper Street
Southampton, NY

Dear June,

I’ve been out watching television tonight but not in a bar.  One of my aunts is trying out a set for a week.  I don’t think they’re going to get one though.  It hasn’t been very successful.  We did see Stop the Music and then they had transmission trouble for an hour.  Of course, we can only get New Haven way out here on Long Island.

I went to art class tonight.  It’s been growing lately.  There were eight other students there tonight.  We’re still having the classes with the assistant.  Partida will come back next week.

I’ll call you Sunday about 12:30.  Remember me to everyone.  Take good care of yourself.  You know I’m so much in love with you, darling.

Lots of love,

Art

(Tomorrow – June in a nasty mood.)

© 2011 Lee Price

Wednesday, April 20, 2011

Spring Fever


Wednesday, April 19, 1950

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City, NY

Dear Art,

I’m in one of those very rare lazy moods.  Well, maybe not so rare…  I didn’t feel like doing anything but writing a letter to you today.  It was such a beautiful day today.  I’m getting spring fever in more ways than one and I miss you, darling.

We may move soon even though it will only be for a short while.  I’d like to get in a place where you can pay by the week.  If we stay here, I’ll go home at the end of May and stay till mid-June.  Then I’d move into another apartment.  So I can’t see paying at least $30 for this place when I won’t be living here.  So maybe we’ll go to a woman’s residence for that last month, or something like that.  Of course, it won’t be too nice if you decide to come
Illustrations by
June Anderson.
in, but it will only be for a month.

Did Carol and Jimmy have a good time with us this weekend?  I like them both.  I was wondering because you said that she talked to Bruno afterward.  I think they enjoyed themselves, didn’t they?  Poor Carol – going into work so early on Monday morning!  Did everyone but you sleep on the way back?

Jane’s sore throat is much worse.  She thinks she might have to have her tonsils out.  By the way, how’s your cold?  I don’t have a trace of one yet.  Aren’t you lucky to go out with such a healthy girl? (Ha!)

Nine more days till I see you, darling.  I’ll be thinking of you all the time.  Good night for now.

All my love,

June

(Tomorrow – transmission trouble.)

                                © 2011 Lee Price

Gosh I Miss You So Much


Wednesday, April 19, 1950

20 Cooper Street
Southampton, NY

Dear June,

Boy and dog, charcoal sketch by Art Price.
Gosh I do miss you so much, my darling.  I’m certainly looking forward to your letter tomorrow.  You know how much I love you.

So much news from you!  I guess I’d better keep still about most of it.  Mary getting married, Jane’s crushes, etc.  I hope the four of you will be able to get a nice apartment.

I’m not too surprised you didn’t care too much for Mary.  I guess maybe Bruno is better off without her.  Actually I think they’re very much alike and that’s why they fought a lot.

I took the car to the garage today.  The clutch needed a little adjustment.  Then I went to the movies tonight and saw Three Came Home.  It was alright, but I don’t imagine you would have liked it.  I think you said you didn’t want to see it.  Then I dropped in and saw Joe and Bruno for a minute afterward but didn’t stay long.

I’m afraid I won’t see you this weekend but I’ll call you Sunday as usual.  I know I’ll see you the next weekend whether you come home or not.  Three weeks is too long without you.  Three days is too long, my darling.

It really feels like spring is here today.  I guess I’ll leave the blanket in my trunk from now on.

I love you very, very much, sweetheart.  You know that I do.

Lots of love,

Art

(Later today – spring fever.)

© 2011 Lee Price

Tuesday, April 19, 2011

The Big Kiss


Tuesday, April 18, 1950

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City, NY

Dear Art,

Fashion illustration by June Anderson.
I’m still thinking about the dance.  I kind of shocked myself after the dance, kissing you in front of everybody like I did.  I never thought I would do anything like that.  But I wasn’t going to see you for such a long time.  And darling, I’m glad I did.  I had a wonderful time – I really did. 

Are you sure there were other people with us?  It seems like I just saw you.  But maybe that’s because you’re all I cared about seeing.  That must mean I’m really in love with you, mustn’t it?  And if you don’t believe it – well, darling, just come up and see me sometime.

We had a swell time at Jane’s house last night.  I love that living room of hers.  It’s so nice and cozy.  (Wouldn’t it be nice to have one like that all to ourselves?)  Anyway, while we were there, Shirl and I and June and Betty decided to take an apartment together this summer.  Their other roommate doesn’t finish school until June 18, so that means that Shirl and I will keep this place until that time and then we’ll all move together.  We ought to be able to
afford quite a nice place (or at least almost a nice place) with the money we chip in.  So there’ll be no room hunting this weekend.  I guess I’ll have to do some homework instead.

I still don’t like Mary though.  Helen seems very nice, but I couldn’t ever room with someone like Mary.  After you left, she came in and bawled us out for making so much noise.  Then when she woke us up in the morning, she scolded Jane again for the same thing.  Jane didn’t say anything but I wish she had.  I think she should have acted more courteous since we were guests.  By the way, Jane thinks Mary will marry within a year.  On the other hand, she doesn’t expect Helen to.

By the way, you were slightly right about Jane.  She had a (as she puts it) mad crush on Singer last year, but got over it during the summer.  When she came back to Southampton, she hadn’t seen Joe for so long that she developed a crush on him.  But it’s definitely gone now.  The dance ended that.

I’ll miss you this weekend, dear.  Take good care of yourself when it comes rolling around.  Don’t go off on too much of a rampage with the boys.  Darling, I love you.

All my love,

June

(Tomorrow – so much news.)

© 2011 Lee Price

A Lovely Time at the Dance

Tuesday, April 18, 1950

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City, NY

Dear Art,

June Anderson, circa 1950.
Just a short note, darling, because it’s already after midnight.  June O’Neal, Betty Neverling, Shirl, and I visited Jane tonight.  Now it’s late and I still have to get washed, dressed for bed and so on.

I had such a lovely time at the dance.  I loved just to sit there and be near you, but best I loved dancing with you.  That was wonderful.  I won’t mention the stage show because you know I enjoyed that.  Words can’t express how much I love you.

There’s a lot I could tell you – different things that happened today.  But I’m so sleepy now...  So I’ll just say thank you for taking me to the dance, thank you very much for being as nice as you are, and I love you so much.  I’ll write a longer letter tomorrow.

All my love,

June

P.S.  It’s about 9:30 Tuesday morning now.  I’m in school.  Do you realize that I’ve had a total of about eight hours sleep in the last two nights?  Wait till tonight, though!  I’ll sure make up for that.

I’m not going room hunting this weekend, but I am staying in the city.  For Shirl’s sake.

Tonight I’ll write you about the room situation and Jane and more, etc. – if I don’t forget about them.

Sometime when I’m home I’ll tell you about Shirl and her boyfriend, too.

Till then,

Love,

June

(Later today – June and the girls.)

© 2011 Lee Price

Monday, April 18, 2011

Safely Home from Brooklyn

Monday, April 17, 1950

20 Cooper Street
Southampton, NY

Dear June,

As you can see, I had no trouble getting out of Brooklyn.  I stopped for breakfast in Smithtown and was home before 8:00 this morning.  Then I slept till noon.

I hope everything went all right with you today and hope Shirl wasn’t too mad at you.  I guess I’m the one she should be mad at.  When I walked into work
this afternoon, Bruno
Main Street, Southampton, from a period postcard.
already knew what time I’d gotten home and all about the trip.  (Not quite everything though.)  I couldn’t figure out how he knew but then found out he had talked to Carol in the drugstore that morning.  She went to work at 10.

Everybody down here seems to have survived all right.  I saw Jimmy this afternoon and Joe Cerullo for a minute tonight when I went for the paper.

I’m about ready to head for bed now.  I can’t imagine why I should be tired, can you?

So long now, sweetheart, and remember me to everybody.  I love you so much.  ’night for now, my darling.

Lots of love,

Art

(Tomorrow – thinking about the dance.)

© 2011 Lee Price

Saturday, April 16, 2011

Unusual Artwork for Art



Although Art rarely expressed any criticisms in his letters to June, he seems to have been somewhat frustrated with his evening art lessons at the Partida School of Arts, located at 18 Cameron Street in Southampton.  His natural style was realistic and his palette tended to be muted.  His favorite subjects were landscapes and seascapes.

It appears that his teachers at the Partida School of Arts pushed him to try new approaches in his art.  Today’s entry highlights two artworks that are unlike any of his other surviving pieces.

The first is this allegorical oil painting that comments upon war and culture.

Oil painting by Art Price.

The second is this dramatic pencil sketch that suggests a man’s death at sea.

Pencil sketch by Art Price, homework for the Partida School of Art.

Both may indeed be personal reflections upon Art’s Navy experiences as a quartermaster third class on minesweepers in the South Pacific.  But they represent styles and approaches that he tried once, and never returned to.

(For Monday – safely home from Brooklyn.)
 
© 2011 Lee Price

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Blame the Post Office


Thursday, April 13, 1950

20 Cooper Street
Southampton, NY

Dear June,

I waited until now to write in hopes I could tell you how the picture turned out and answer your morning letter.  Well, I didn’t get a letter this morning and the picture won’t be finished till this afternoon.

I’ll blame not getting a letter on the post office department for now.  I’d better get one this afternoon though!  If you don’t write to me ---- !!!!

Anyway I still love you very much, darling.  This has been my morning off.  I slept late then went out and got a haircut.  Yesterday, I put the car in the garage to get tuned up, greased etc. – all ready for this weekend.  I finished John Hersey’s The Wall last night then went to bed fairly early.

Pencil sketch by Art Price.
As far as I know Joe hasn’t made that phone call yet.  If I see him tonight maybe I’ll drag him into the phone booth.

I think I’ll go across the street now and see how the baby is.  Remember me to Shirl.  See you Friday night, sweetheart.  Till then I love you very much.

Lots of love,

Art

(For Monday – safely home from Brooklyn.)
 

© 2011 Lee Price

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

We're in Love


Wednesday, April 12, 1950

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City, NY

Dear Art,
Fashion illustrations by June Anderson.

When I think about it, that must have been some awful letter I wrote you Monday night!  But I’m sure you’ll excuse it on sleepiness grounds.  I went to bed as soon as I finished it.

I wonder if Joe’s asked Jane yet, or if he will at all?  I’m dying to know.

Shirl’s out on a date with Ted tonight.  She just left about fifteen minutes ago.  So darling, I’m all by myself.  I plan to stay up and do homework until Shirl comes home.

I accomplished quite a bit of work in school today, too.  That makes
me feel good, but I’m still way behind.  I don’t understand how I can fall so far behind.

- - - - -

Darling, it’s four hours later now – 1:15 a.m.  I put up the letter and did some homework.  Shirl’s home.  She came in about 45 minutes ago and says she had a very nice time.  Ted’s going home with her on Friday and will bring her back Sunday.  They have a nice weekend planned out.

But no matter how well they plan they won’t have near as nice a time as we will.  How could they?  We’re in love – aren’t we, dear?  I am, anyway.

I hope you’ve rested up some.  This is my last letter before the weekend.  I’ll be waiting for yours tomorrow.

Didn’t we have a nice time on my vacation?  The only trouble was it ended too soon.

All my love,

June

(Tomorrow – everything's behind schedule.)

© 2011 Lee Price

Tuesday, April 12, 2011

Looking Back on a Wonderful Week

Watercolor by Art Price.

Tuesday, April 11, 1950

20 Cooper Street
Southampton, NY

Dear June,

Darling, it was a wonderful week, wasn’t it?  I do love you so very much.  One evening gone already, just a few more till I see you again.  Be sure and get lots of sleep this week and don’t forget to write to me.

No news to tell you.  I got to work before the boss this morning (that wasn’t very early).  Joe came in the store just before 6.  He hasn’t phoned Jane yet.  I hope he does it tonight.  Bruno was in bad shape today.  He had a tough day yesterday, I guess.  I started reading The Wall again early in the evening and now I’ve almost finished it.  Nothing more to tell you, darling, except that I miss you more than ever tonight.  I love you, I love you, I love you, my sweetheart.

Lots of love,

Art

(Tomorrow – June's alone while Shirl's out with Ted)

© 2011 Lee Price

Monday, April 11, 2011

A Lovely Easter Vacation


Monday, April 10, 1950

46 West 83rd Street, Apt. 7B
New York City, NY

Dear Art,

Sketch by June Anderson.

Art, darling, I still can’t get over what a wonderful time I had this vacation.  It was beautiful.  I feel sorry for all the other kids whose vacations surely couldn’t even begin to compare with my lovely one.

This is just a note to let you know I arrived back in the city safely this morning.  Shirl is here, too.  When I got home from school today I didn’t even feel sleepy.  Shirl and I went out to eat at five and then I thought it would be nice to go to the movies.  We came back to the room to decide on the movie, but I happened to lie down on the couch and fell right asleep for about three hours.  Then I got up, put on my pajamas, washed my face, made my bed (new sheets), and now I’m ready to tumble in.  Just as soon as I finish this letter.

In regard to sleep, I hope you’ll behave just about the same as I did tonight.

I love you very much, darling.  I’ll write more tomorrow.

All my love,

June

(Tomorrow – report from Southampton.)

© 2011 Lee Price

Friday, April 8, 2011

Easter in Riverhead


June and her brother Teddy
with the family house in
the background.

The wandering holiday of Easter came early in 1950, falling on the second Sunday of the month, April 9.  June was on vacation from school the entire week preceding Easter.  She had made plans with Art to see him every single night of the vacation.

Easter was June’s mother’s favorite holiday.  She loved the fancy hats that she and other women would wear to church in the morning (an old-fashioned tradition celebrated in the 1948 musical Easter Parade).  She appreciated the opportunity to make a proper Virginia-style Easter dinner.  And she always had a sweet tooth so she liked to have plenty of Easter candy around, too.

The family would dye and decorate the eggs the night before, with a dozen eggs put aside for each.  After attending church on Easter morning, the family returned to the house where June and her younger brother Teddy would participate in an Easter Egg hunt.  They had a big yard with bushes lining the house, creating plenty of places to hide the eggs.

After the Easter Egg hunt, June’s mother served Easter dinner at mid-afternoon in the dining room.  In addition to the ham, there were green beans prepared Southern style and mashed potatoes with milk gravy.  Everyone relaxed after the big feast – except perhaps for June, who would probably have started preparing for the anticipated late afternoon arrival of Art.

(For Sunday – Easter in Southampton.)
 
© 2011 Lee Price

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

What's on Television?


The Lone Ranger starring Clayton Moore.

June’s father loved to be on the cutting-edge of technology and was very handy with electronics.  Therefore it’s no surprise that the Andersons were the first on their block to buy a television.  There’s nothing in the letters to indicate that the family had a television by this April 1950 date, but the purchase probably came around this time.

It would still be a couple of years before the Prices bought their first set.  In early 1950, Art watched most of his television at bars and restaurants.

Milton Berle on the
cover of Time (1949).
The top-rated show of 1950 was the Texaco Star Theater which made a superstar of Milton Berle.  He even appeared on the cover of Time in 1949, less than a year after he assumed host responsibilities on the long-running show (which started on radio in 1938 and starred Fred Allen from 1940 to 1944).  Milton Berle’s routines went out to the world every Tuesday night from 8 to 9.

The second biggest show was Toast of the Town with host Ed Sullivan, a former Daily News entertainment columnist.  It became a long-running staple of Sunday night television, always running from 8 to 9.  Known as Toast of the Town in 1950, the show would continue to gain in popularity and is now much better known by its title from 1955 onward, the Ed Sullivan Show.

Variety shows were the most popular, but there were also critically-acclaimed shows that offered hour-long self-contained dramas often featuring Broadway stars.  These included Philco Television Playhouse, Fireside Theatre, and Ford Theatre.

A new generation of entertainers was starting to emerge through the new medium.  Milton Berle was the biggest, but there were others.  Jackie Gleason rose to prominence on television in 1949 with The Life of Riley, a situation comedy adapted from a popular radio show.  In early 1950, Gleason moved to serve as host of a major variety show, Cavalcade of Stars, where he started to develop a variety of comic characters.  His most famous character, the bus driver Ralph Kramden, was introduced in October 1951.  Another rising star, Sid Caesar, launched his variety show Your Show of Shows on February 25, 1950, bringing with him a very talented cast including Imogene Coca, Carl Reiner, and Howard Morris.

Kukla Fran and Ollie.
Here are some of the other shows that were on the air, and probably familiar to June and Art, in March 1950:  Kukla, Fran and Ollie;  Howdy Doody;  The Original Amateur Hour;  Candid Camera;  the CBS Evening News with Douglas Edwards;  and The Lone Ranger.

But there was much still to come in the fast-changing world of television.  Here are some of the things that June and Art probably wouldn’t have predicted:  Lucille Ball was still just a b-movie star in 1950 – the premiere of I Love Lucy was still a year and a half away (October 15, 1951).  There were no soap operas on television yet.  The first TV soap operas, Love of Life and Search for Tomorrow, wouldn’t appear until fall 1951.  Within the year, Your Hit Parade, Truth or Consequences, the George Burns and Gracie Allen Show, and the Jack Benny Show would all move to television – but not quite yet.

June and Art grew up with radio as the center of home entertainment, but times were changing fast in 1950.  Art, in particular, seemed very aware of the television offerings that he and the boys would catch in the bars that they frequented.  It was quickly becoming a normal part of their lives.

With apologies to my wife (who prefers it when I work with more reputable sources), most of the information in this entry comes from Wikipedia.

(For Friday – celebrating Easter Sunday.)

 © 2011 Lee Price